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TMCNet:  Ping.it Cuts through the Digital Noise of Social Media and E-mail

[December 12, 2012]

Ping.it Cuts through the Digital Noise of Social Media and E-mail

Dec 12, 2012 (M2 PRESSWIRE via COMTEX) -- Ping.it, an Oslo-based web startup, introduces an alternative to information overload and mass content sharing. The new technology lets people send "pings" - relevant content recommendations - straight to designated recipients instead of sharing to a public stream, as in traditional social networks. And unlike e-mail accounts, the Ping.it inbox has no address that can be reached by unsolicited content.

According to an academic study by the University of California, San Diego, an average Internet user spends as many as 12 hours on news consumption every day, faced with as much as 100,000 words in emails, social network updates and other online content. Users exposed to such an overabundance of news have obvious trouble finding what's relevant for them.

"We are at a tipping point. We can't continue to spend more and more time online," says Marius Lian, CEO, Ping.it. "We will be forced to replace what we spend time on with something better. It's inevitable." Ping.it attempts to tackle this problem with a new architecture, described as a hybrid between e-mail and a social network, connecting key assets of both tools. Just like an e-mail, it requires users to add recipients - individuals or groups - to any ping, which makes the message personal and relevant. The sender needs to decide who might be most interested in the page he pings. Thanks to this direct approach as much as 87.5% of all pings sent in Ping.it spark some form of interaction - considerably more than on Facebook or Twitter.

Unlike an e-mail, however, a Ping.it inbox is available only to people and groups a user accepts. It has no address that could be reached by spammers. It also offers a graphical social stream showcasing all sent and received pings, as well as a flexible groups system that allows people to create their own social clusters, where they can exchange content and collaborate privately.

In order to ping, a user just needs to paste a link within Ping.it or use the Ping.it browser button when visiting any page. Then, it's enough to add contacts that could be interested in the link and ping it to them. Recipients are immediately notified and can join the user online to 'like', comment or reping the link. What's important, they don't have to register in order to receive pings, so unlike many social platforms, an early adopter doesn't have to convince all of the friends to sign up.

"Ping.it solves two of the biggest problems online today: bloated inboxes and crowded public walls," continues Marius Lian. "And the solution is simple - a Web inbox without an address, where you receive personally recommended links. In Ping.it, you only get the content you want, from people you accept, as you only share with your contacts what's relevant to them. That is the key difference." About Ping.it Ping.it is headquartered in Oslo and founded by hacker and entrepreneur Marius Lian. The main motivation behind Ping.it is his personal frustration over hundreds of emails he receives daily, and over irrelevant content he sees posted on various social networks. The development and design teams are located in Poland and the UK.

For more details: please enter www.ping.it contact Marius Lian, CEO at marius@ping.it, +47 93001765 or follow us: https://www.facebook.com/JoinPingit https://twitter.com/JoinPingit http://ping.it/blog ((M2 Communications disclaims all liability for information provided within M2 PressWIRE. Data supplied by named party/parties. Further information on M2 PressWIRE can be obtained at http://www.presswire.net on the world wide web. Inquiries to info@m2.com.

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