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TMCNet:  Star Tribune (Minneapolis) Steve Alexander column

[October 02, 2012]

Star Tribune (Minneapolis) Steve Alexander column

Oct 02, 2012 (Star Tribune (Minneapolis) - McClatchy-Tribune Information Services via COMTEX) -- QMy wife and I are considering the purchase of an iPad and need to know if, in addition to receiving or sending e-mail, it can send a signal to a wireless printer to print a document received by e-mail. Are there special set-up instructions required to do this Also, we're considering buying an MP3 music player. It appears that the iPhone can do everything that the iPod Touch does, plus act as a phone. Is there any reason I would not choose the iPhone over the iPod Touch ALLAN SCHWARTZ, OTTAWA APrinting wirelessly from an iPad should be easy, but sometimes it's not. The iPad uses Apple software called AirPrint. Printers on a home Wi-Fi network that are AirPrint-enabled should show up on your iPad as available for printing. Apple compares some Epson and HP printers that are AirPrint-enabled at tinyurl.com/8lx63zd.

But whether a printer is AirPrint-compatible or not, if the software it uses isn't the most recent version, you can have problems. So you may have to download an update for your printer. This same update problem can also occur with your wireless router, which acts as an intermediary between the iPad and the printer.

You can also use non-AirPrint-enabled printers if there is a downloadable iPad printing app for them. In the iTunes app store, I saw iPad apps for HP, Brother, Canon and Lexmark printers.

Why would you buy an iPod Touch when an iPhone does more No reason I can think of, provided that you want a new phone. The iPod's functionality is incorporated into the iPhone.

QWhen I use Comcast's Web-based e-mail at home, I get only the option of downloading an e-mail attachment. I don't want to download strange attachments to my computer, and I don't want to download and then have to delete documents that I only need to read once.

I don't know if this issue is caused by Windows 7, Internet Explorer 10, Norton security software or Comcast e-mail. How can I get normal options on my e-mails TOM REYNEN, SHOREVIEW AI understand your reluctance to download e-mail attachments from sources you don't know; they can house malicious software.

In this case, it appears that your inability to view rather than download an attachment is a Comcast e-mail issue. Talk to Comcast's technical help line to see if they can assist you (try 800-934-6489); I've had good luck with them.

But if they can't solve your problem, I suggest getting a different Web e-mail provider. Google's free Gmail will allow you to either download an attachment or view it online without downloading it.

E-mail tech questions to steve.j.alexander @gmail.com or write to Tech Q&A, 425 Portland Av., Minneapolis, MN 55488. Include name, city and telephone number.

___ (c)2012 the Star Tribune (Minneapolis) Visit the Star Tribune (Minneapolis) at www.startribune.com Distributed by MCT Information Services

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